Overarching Principles of Well-Ageing

JansenFit’s services are developed out of two principles of well-ageing. These principles are foundational to our discussions on well-ageing, and they come out of the awareness of the contributions we have yet to make.

Principle 1: Proactively Cultivating Wellness

First is the principle of proactively cultivating wellness. Many of us grew up in a world that managed health through curative or restorative medicine for treating illness or trauma; in other words, if we weren’t sick, we didn’t think about health. In fact, we didn’t manage health at all – what we managed was sickness! The only time we thought about health was when we were ill or injured.  The principle of proactivity demands that we actively pursue health, through the making of conscious healthy choices and behaviors. It is the recognition that health is not the absence of sickness; rather, sickness is the absence of health.

health is not the absence of sickness; rather, sickness is the absence of health.

When it comes to health, there is no such thing as standing still. We are either growing or we are declining. Physical decline, and in some ways mental decline as well, are inevitable with ageing. But our overall wellness need not decline, as our there is no limit to the growth of our spirit – if we choose to feed it.

Our bodies (including our brains) are very efficient. They build internal capability only to levels demanded of them – no wasting of resources on excess capacity. Part of cultivating wellness is demanding enough – challenging our bodies to develop maximal capability, challenging our minds to always be learning, and challenging our souls always to be growing.

Principle 2: Holistic Strategies

And that brings us to our second principle: that we pursue our wellness through holistic strategies, which means tending to body health, mind health, and spirit health. None of the three aspects of wellness exists independently of the other two, and the physiological mechanisms supporting each individually and all-three together are inextricably intertwined.

Body health means having the physical wherewithal to meet life’s demands and opportunities. It requires muscular strength & endurance, aerobic endurance, flexibility, healthy body composition, agility, balance, coordination, and other
measurable physical attributes. Mind, or mental health means having the mental and emotional wherewithal to meet life’s demands and opportunities, including the ability to create and recall new memories, process logical, creative and philosophic thoughts, have meaningful relationships, and manage functionally – navigating daily challenges of living like driving, managing the household, paying bills and cooking.

Spirit health is the key to motivating all behaviors, which makes it key to body and mind health as well.

If body and mind health mean having physical and mental wherewithal, respectively, what is the unique role played by spiritual health? For me, it means holding in deep reverence, the overarching purpose that makes it all worth doing. It is one’s higher purpose and motivation, the knowing of one’s ultimate source – of energy, strength, connection, peace and values. Spirit health is the key to motivating all behaviors, which makes it key to body and mind health as well.

The Triunity of Wellness: Body, Mind and Spirit

The body (& brain) and its physiological systems are the mechanisms through which we express our purpose, accomplish our tasks, think, reason, create and relate to each other. Spirit health is the key to motivating all behaviors, which makes it key to body and mind health as well.

The entirety of who we are is far more than the sum of body, mind and spirit; absent any one of the three, we do not exist at all! That is the human quality of triunity.

Future posts will dig deeper into what all of this means to our best well-ageing practices. In the meantime, what are your thoughts?

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